Welcome to our Club!

Join us for lunch! (412) 471-6210

Pittsburgh

Service Above Self

We meet Wednesdays at 12:00 PM
Omni William Penn Hotel
555 Grant St. Check Marquee for Room #
Pittsburgh, PA  15219
United States
DistrictSiteIcon
District Site
VenueMap
Venue Map
 
Home Page Stories
Application for Rotary Club Scholarship!
 
 
 
Pittsburgh Rotary along with many terrific District 7300 Rotary and Interact clubs have made the 2014-2015 Shoes for Nicaragua Project a huge success!
 
The third Shoes for Nicaragua campaign is now complete. .  Rotary and Interact clubs, companies, schools, doctors’ offices, etc. have completed their drives and their gently used children’s have been delivered to our shipper in Cincinnati.
 
Many other organizations conducted campaigns this campaign period ending in July 2015. This year we collected over 5,000 pairs of gently used children’s shoes which brings our three year total to over 20,000.
 
The Shoes for Nicaragua committee wants to thank everyone who has helped in this year’s project. It’s proven to be a simple, efficient and effective international project that has immediate benefits to the recipients, who are children in Nicaragua who need shoes to attend school but their families cannot afford shoes for every child. We are making a difference. Pittsburgh Rotary looks forward to our fourth campaign led by Rotarian Alexis England.
 

 
 
Image
 

 
 
 

 
 

GABC,Image

PITTSBURGH, PA, USA - Feb. 19, 2014 – The German American Business Circle of Pittsburgh is partnering with the Pittsburgh Rotary Club Foundation to launch a $2,500 scholarship. It is intended to benefit collegiate-level students in Western Pennsylvania who demonstrate academic excellence and strong interest in German-American business affairs and culture, and who plan to further their studies at an accredited institution of higher learning in Germany.

 

 
 
 
Rotarians are people who like to help people.  We currently have a special opportunity to help a lot of children who need something very basic, a pair of shoes.
Children in Nicaragua have access to public education, but there’s one catch. They must wear shoes to school. Most families in Nicaragua cannot afford shoes for their children. Thus the poverty cycle continues.

How can you help? Our Pittsburgh Rotary club is starting a project called Shoes for Nicaragua. We are asking organizations, churches, schools, clubs and workplaces to help get the word out to their members and workers.

What is needed? Gently used children’s shoes. We are also accepting school supplies such as pencils, pads and other basic school items.

The Rotary Club of Pittsburgh has a number of highly respected contacts in Nicaragua who will ensure that the shoes will get to the people most in need.
How to get started? This will vary with each situation. Basically, just get the word out and start collecting shoes. 

Image 

 
 
 
Image
 
 
 

Pittsburgh Rotarian Alexis Wukich traveled to Kenya in late July 2013 to serve as a volunteer and learn more about Hekima Place.

 
 
 

This summer Pittsburgh Rotarian Alexis Wukich will travel to Kenya to serve as a volunteer and representative of the Rotary Club of Pittsburgh at Hekima Place.  Below is her description of the project.  To donate please go to http://www.gofundme.com/wukich

 

Image
 
 
 

Follow Pittsburgh Rotarian Alexis Wukich this summer as she travels to Kenya to serve as a volunteer and representative of the Rotary Club of Pittsburgh at Hekima Place.

http://lexietravels.blogspot.com/

Hekima Place is a home in Kenya for girls orphaned primarily by HIV/AIDS. The name “Hekima” was chosen for its Kiswahili meaning: Wisdom. Founded in 2005 by Pittsburgh native Kate Fletcher, the home opened with just 10 girls but has grown to 60 members of the Hekima Place family. 






Day 1
It is hard to believe we have been in Kenya for 24 hours.  We arrived last evening around 9:20 pm.  We didn't get our visas until 10:40.  Fortunately our bags were waiting for us as was our driver from Hekima Place.  We got to Hekima Place a little after midnight.  The city streets of Nairobi seemed so quiet at night, but it was nothing compared to the quiet out here in the hills.  



Kate kindly stayed up to welcome us and showed us to the "Karibu House," where volunteers stay during their visit.  We have lots of room - up to 17 could actually stay here.  It is identical to the three residences were the girls live with  their "mums" who act as total caretakers of the girls. We have a large common area and a kitchen with appliances!  



After 22 hours of travel, Joe and I were pretty quick to call it an evening.  Kate advised that we take our first day easy because we would be exhausted.  I thought she was being over-cautious, but boy was she right.  This morning ans afternoon I was struggling with jet lag that even my Starbucks Via couldn't cure!  I went back to bed while my awesome travel buddy, Joe, went to explore (his jet lag set in while we were in a cab later that day when he fell asleep mid-sentence).



Once I finally got moving, Joe and I toured the grounds and met some of the "mums" and "uncles."  The operation they have here is truly amazing!  The uncles take care of the grounds, the animals and security.  There are goats, cows, chickens (and chicks) and rabbits. They harvest corn, potatoes, tomatoes, and beans.  They collect rain water from the roofs.  Whatever resources they collect, grow or raise, they use and if the don't use it, they sell it.



After meeting and greeting, Joe and I headed to Karen to do some shopping.  The drive through the small towns and markets was eye-opening.  We had passed these towns, Ngong and Kiserian, on our way from the airport, but it was dark and there was almost no activity.  Late afternoon was a different story!  Thousands of people milling about, merchants, markets, goats and donkeys.  I should have been taking pictures, but I was so awestruck and busy giving myself eyestrain.  



In Karen, we bought lots of groceries and a modem so we can get Internet (and I could update all of you!!).   We got back to late to have dinner with the girls, so fortunately we picked up some KFC carry out.



After our lovely home cooked meal, Joe and I settled in to watch "Half the Sky," a documentary about the struggles and abuses of women and girls worldwide.  A timely pick given that Joe and I had the pleasure of meeting Hekima's newest guest, a beautiful ten year old girl named Yvonne who was rescued from Nairobi hospital after being enslaved and then repeatedly sexually and physically abused.  Her attack was so brutal she was in the hospital more than a week.  Rather than cower or hide, the first thing she did when we met was smile ear to ear and give me a HUGE bear hug.  I can't even express in words the feeling.  I don't think I ever can.  Sophia, who works in the office said to me, "Of course Mum (Kate) took her in.  She is a baby who was a slave and who was raped.  She has no parents.  She has no where to go, so she comes here."









Posted by Alexis Wukich at 1:12 PM 





Day 2
This morning we has the opportunity to go to the Good Hope School.  The school goes from ages 4-5 in baby and nursery classes to 8th grade.  The student body is made up of the elementary-aged students from Hekima Place, children from the Good Hope Orphanage and local children.  The school is just 2 kilometers away but the road is quite hilly and in very bad shape.  The girls go by bus every morning and afternoon.  



The school system in Kenya works on a trimester schedule with one month long breaks in April, August and December.  Since it is the end of their second term the students were talking their exams.  We started our morning in the teacher's lounge with morning prayer and a ministry on forgiveness provided by the head teacher.  Next we were off to help out in the classroom.  Joe proctored the 6th grade social studies test and I gave some of the nursery students their exam.  



The nursery students were quite intrigued by Joe and I.  Kyla, a young girl was fascinated with my blue eyes and pointy nose.  My hair, earrings and bangle also got a lot of attention!



After exams, we broke for tea at the Orphanage.  We had an amazing chai tea while the little ones had porridge.  After tea, the children had time to play outside while we got to take a look at the "conservation classroom" and their pet tortoises.  Beginning in first grade, all students at Good Hope learn about conservation as part of their curriculum.  Partly in an effort to preserve the 91% of Kenya that has game roaming on its land a d partly to teach the students from more rural areas how to be more effective in cultivating sanitary and prosperous lives.  As an aside, did you know the ivory trade is still a huge problem in Kenya?  Every day, 5 elephants are slaughtered for their ivory.



After learning about Good Hope's green education, we got to enjoy a special school assembly that was prepared for some special visitors.  As special as we were (I am sure), these guests were BIG TIME: visitors from the World Bank.  The show was amazing with singing, dancing, percussion, poetry and dramatic performances.



As we headed back to Hekima, the children went out to play a little football while the staff and teachers looked on.  These kids all seem happy and well adjusted!  It's amazing to know that half the student body comes from either the Good Hope Orphanage or Hekima Place.  The other half live with their biological family - some in places where there is no running water.  If you didn't know it, you wouldn't realize it because when you look around you just see a bunch of well-mannered kids enjoying their time at school, albeit some with tattered and torn uniforms, mismatched socks and tights, shoes that are flopping off their feet or clothes that are two sizes too small.  



Posted by Alexis Wukich at 6:30 AM 

 

 
 
 

Please click here to see what really happens at those Rotary meetings.

 

 
 

The Rotary Club of Pittsburgh is a downtown club of business and organizational leaders committed to improving the quality of life in our community and to insure that every young person has an opportunity to succeed.

Our members are part of a worldwide network of Rotarians who volunteer time, talent and treasure to make life better in their communities and for those at risk.

We join with the 1350 members of the other 51 clubs in District 7300 in the belief that together we're stronger and our communities are stronger because of our commitment.

 

 
 
"Your Local Rotary Club"
 
  
 
 

Bulletin Subscribe

Subscribe to our eBulletin and stay up to date on the latest news and events.

 
RSS
Grant survey shows solid support for new model
More than 6,000 Rotary members in 154 countries reported on their experiences with the new grant model as part of an evaluation during the 2015-16 Rotary year. The results will help us improve the grant process and learn what impact the Foundation's global grants have on our areas of focus. Among the key findings: 90 percent of respondents support the grant model; 86 percent see it as an improvement over the former model. Grant activity and the average grant award continue to increase each year. Rotary members want more resources to help them apply for grants and design sustainable projects...
Committee members named to nominate 2018-19 Rotary president
The following Rotary members will serve on the 2016-17 Nominating Committee for President of Rotary International in 2018-19. The committee is scheduled to meet on 8 August. Zone 2Kazuhiko Ozawa, Rotary Club of Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan Zone 4 Sudarshan Agarwal, Rotary Club of Delhi, Delhi, India Zone 6 Noraseth Pathmanand, Rotary Club of Bang Rak, Thailand Zone 8 John B. Boag, Rotary Club of E-Club of District 9650, New South Wales, Australia Zone 10 Jackson S.L. Hsieh, Rotary Club of Taipei Sunrise, Taiwan Zone 12 Elio Cerini, Rotary Club of Milano Duomo, Italy Zone 14 Ekkehart Pandel,...
eBay Live Auctions that benefit Rotary
Each month, eBay, the world’s largest auction website, selects a set of upcoming Live Auction events and donates a portion of all sales proceeds to Rotary. Only U.S. auction sales are eligible. See the schedule of July auctions.
Apply to serve on an RI committee
Would you like to contribute to Rotary by serving on a committee? The 10 committees listed below are searching for qualified candidates for openings in 2017-18. Each of these committees works with Rotary leaders to increase efficiency and promote the goals and priorities of our strategic plan. Apply for a committee appointment by 14 August. Learn more about the committees and the application process. Get answers to frequently asked questions. Committees with openings for 2017-18 Audit Communications Constitution and Bylaws Election Review Finance Global Networking Groups Joint Young Leaders...
John Germ: Champion of Chattanooga
From the July 2016 issue of The Rotarian Just before John Germ dropped by, Rick Youngblood took a deep breath. “You want to match his energy,” he says, “but he makes it hard to keep up.” Youngblood is the president and CEO of Blood Assurance, a regional blood bank in Chattanooga, Tenn., that Germ helped found in 1972. After his visit with Youngblood, Germ strode between mountains of empty bottles and cans at Chattanooga’s John F. Germ Recycling Center at Orange Grove, which he designed, before he drove to a construction site and popped a cork to dedicate a Miracle League field where special...